Leave to Remain

leave to remain
Billy Cullum and Tyrone Huntley. Photo by Johan Persson

Lyric Hammersmith. On until 16 February.

A crowded London street and two young men catch each other’s eye, hook up and fall in love. What follows is the interweaving of their friends and families and personal histories told through a play with songs (written by Matt Jones and Kele Okereke from Bloc Party) and dance.

This is a modern inter-racial gay love story that tackles the issues of families, secrets, lies and trust within a relationship. Told with a freshness and honesty that had me captivated, even though I thought I knew where the story was heading.

Populated with sucker punch songs, some that could easily be stand alone singles – ‘Not the Drugs Talking’ ‘The Sea Between Us’, ‘To Family’, ‘5 Years’, ‘The Lies We Tell’ – which add emotional depth and richness to the characters and scenes. Our lead lovers Obi ( Tyrone Huntley who I last saw as Judas in Jesus Christ Superstar) and Alex (Billy Cullum) turn in some terrific performances. But other characters, such as the mothers (Rakie Ayola as Grace and Johanne Murdock as Diane) get some touching moments. Even the ‘bad’ best friend Damian gets to open up his heart in ‘More Than You Know’ with a beautiful performance by Arun Blair-Mangat. (Album details at the end of this post.)

If all this wasn’t enough, you get something truly visually stunning in the choreography by director Robby Graham. You start to get a sense of the power this can bring in an early scene in a nightclub (usually something that falls flat and unbelievable in other plays), but it is at moments of drama such as the family dinner where we get balletic repetitive movements that hint at how each of the characters are themselves stuck in their actions and their ways of seeing the world, that had me doing emotional cartwheels of joy inside.

Running until 16 Feb you need to stop what you’re doing, grab life with both hands and get to see this joyous feast of life, love, music and dance!

January 19 (Stalls L5-6)

20/20

 

leave to remain album artwork
Album artwork by Alex Noble

The album Leave to Remain is now available on iTunes

 

My Theatre Picks for 2019

London Theatre 2019
Clockwise: Death of a Salesman, All About Eve, Blood Wedding, When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other, Berberian Sound Studio, Shipwreck

So here are some things that are getting me excited about theatre in 2019.  As there seem to be some themes emerging I thought I’d have a go at grouping under headings.

 

Something old: classics re-told

There is a bit of a revival of Arthur Miller this year, with productions of All My Sons and The American Clock at the Old Vic and Death of a Salesman at The Young Vic.

There are a couple of versions of Chekov’s The Three Sisters with the fabulous Patsy Ferran (currently in Summer and Smoke) coming to The Almeida and a production at the National directed by Nadia Fall (Artistic Director of Theatre Royal Stratford East) setting the play in Nigeria during the Biafran Civil War in the 1960s.

David Hare is bringing a new version of Peter Gynt @ National in July with James McArdle taking the lead.

Then we have Lorca’s play Blood Wedding gets a make over with Yaël Farber directing @ Young Vic (19 Sep – 2 Nov).  And the last time Lorca got made over at the Young Vic, it was Yerma and deservedly won Billie Piper an Olivier.  So no pressure!

 

Film adaptations

So I’m excited about Peter Strickland’s 2012 horror film Berbarian Sound Studio coming to the Donmar Warehouse (8 Feb – 30 Mar).  And already booking is the musical of the classic 1980’s comedy 9 to 5 open at the Savoy Theatre 28 Jan and runs until August.

Then there is an adaptation of Thomas Vinterberg’s film The Hunt, adapted by David Farr and directed by Rupert Goold at The Almeida. Runs 17 Jun – 3 Aug.

And then there is possibly the hottest ticket in the West End, All About Eve, directed by Ivo van Hove and starring Gillian Anderson who last trod the boards in A Streetcar Named Desire at the Young Vic in 2016. This adaptation runs 2 Feb – 11 May.

 

Novels staged

Andrea Levy’s Small Island comes to the National in May, directed by Rufus Norris.

Richardson’s Pamela gets a re-working as When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other, a timely look at sexual politics, but unless you got your tickets in the National Theatre’s ballot already you’ll be unlikely to be seeing Cate Blanchett on the stage except via NTLive. Runs 16 Jan – 2 Mar.

 

New plays

Downstate @ National by Bruce Norris – provocative play which looks interesting (12 Mar to 27 Apr).

Shipwreck by Ann Washburn @ Almeida and directed by Rupert Goold (12 Feb – 30 Mar).

Hansard by Simon Woods staring Lindsay Duncan @ National looks like it might be an intriguing story about a couple and politics. Plus I love Lindsay Duncan!

 

Transfers from America

We have the eagerly awaited hit Broadway musical Waitress taking over from Kinky Boots residence at The Adelphi (previews from 8 Feb).

Fairview comes to the Young Vic in November following a sell out run in New York.

 

PlayTech

Trying out new technologies in theatre can be a risky business, and it has often been set design where the most adventurous (and disastrous) uses of innovation have been seen. in 2019 there are two so far I’m intrigued by:

Draw Me Close @ Young Vic – VR play

ANNA, by Ella Hickson will have the audience wearing headphones to immerse them in 1968 East Berlin with sound designer Ben and Max Ringham, in what is being described as “a ground-breaking new sonic collaboration” at the National (from May).

December Picks

December Picks
Photo credits include Merry Wives by Manuel Harlan © RSC; White Teeth by Mark Douet

So for this current month I’ve got the following plays booked up:

Uncle Vanya @ Hampstead Theatre – so I’m a plus one for a friend’s booking, but I never turn down a chance to see a classic.

Merry Wives of Windsor @ Barbican Theatre – the initial reason for booking this was because I’m having a light-hearted competition to have seen all Shakespeare’s plays before another friend, and this one is on my “not seen” list, however this RSC transfer to the Barbican looks like a thoroughly engaging production.

The Convert @ The Young Vic – a powerful new play looking at religion and colonialism set in 1896 in what is now Zimbabwe.

Sweat @ Donmar Warehouse – a UK premiere of a play based on research in 2011 by playwright Lynn Nottage into the lives of the people in one of the poorest cities in the US.  It looks like it might shine a light into some of the root causes behind the Trump’s popularity.

And I’m still yet to get around to book the following

Nine Night @ Trafalgar Studios – because I missed it when it was at the National Theatre.

Pinter 5 & 6 @ The Pinter Theatre – because I’ve now managed to see Pinter 1-3 and the cast includes Jane Horrocks, Rupert Graves, Celia Imrie and John Simm.

White Teeth @ Kiln Theatre – what sounds like a clever adaptation of Zadie Smith’s

And a couple that have been running for a while, that might just get a Christmas outing:

42nd Street @ Theatre Royal – just because some toe-tapping show tunes scream Christmas and now Bonnie Langford is staring

Tina @ Aldywch Theatre – for the music and Adrienne Warren performance

 

 

20/20 Vision

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Top Marks – End of Summer Term Report*

By way of an end of summer report I thought perhaps I’d comment on the productions I’ve seen so far this year that have reached the high water mark of 20. Going forward it isn’t my intention to retrospectively discuss plays and musicals I’ve seen that have now closed, unless they are likely to transfer.  Here though I want  to give some indication of what I’m prepared to give these marks to, and why.

So before I start praising, I will add just that there is no mathematical formula being applied to my scores. I am not for example dividing up a production into scores for acting, staging, creative interpretations or story.  It is instead more of a gut feeling (which I appreciate is subject to many and various pressures). As I leave a show, was I enraptured? On the edge of my seat? Wanting to leap into the aisles and dance? Was I challenged or stimulated (intellectually)? Or did I not feel it? Did I come away feeling like something was missing or off or out of kilter? Was I bored or distracted? Was I inwardly rolling my eyes and tutting?

Now given that writing reviews is not something I’m trained or particularly experienced in doing, other than verbal enthusiastic recommendations to friends, I beg some leniency. I will though try and be as balanced and even handed as I can.  I will state the night I saw the show and where I was siting (as I’m of the belief that sitting in the front of the stalls vs back of the upper circle can influence your experience of a show). Although forgive me for this post I wont add these details. And I’m more than happy to have alternative views shared.

One final caveat is simply this: I never read or studied English or plays beyond GCSE, so any understanding or interpretation is coming from my background of enjoying the theatre, and possibly having seen different productions of a play.

So in the order I saw them this year:

Hamilton – So it probably goes without saying that receives top marks. An all round impressive production from music to performances and staging, of which much has been written already.  I’ll only add simply that this is one show that lives up to the hype. And if you’re worrying you can’t get a ticket until 2019, then you can always try their ticket lottery: https://hamiltonmusical.com/lottery/ 

Network – A tour de force that cleverly brought the 1976 film to life.  Brian Cranston was incredible in his performance of news anchorman Howard Beale, with an equally talented supporting cast.  For me it was staging and live camera feeds projected up onto screens behind that was particularly clever (too often such efforts seem out of place) given the story being told. That, combined with this being a story about truth and how the news (and the public) is manipulated, made it a perfect play.

The Brothers Size – Almost at the other end of the production budget scale came at the Young Vic.  A beautiful moving story simply told, in a chalk circle drawn by one of the actors at the start of the play.  Written by Tarell Alvin McCraney (writer of the film Moonlight) this play demonstrated how talented he is.

Summer and Smoke – Another big hitter by Tennessee Williams at The Almeida.  Happily and deservedly it is getting a transfer to the Duke of York’s in November, and well worth going. Whilst a fan of Tennessee Williams, I did not know this play. For me this was an incredible and magical production.  The simple staging powerfully creating the atmospheric setting, with a wonderful performance from Patsy Ferran as a minister’s daughter.

The Inheritance Part 1 & 2 – Hard on the heels of the revival of Angels in America at the National last year, this was inevitably going to draw comparisons with its themes of gay men and the impact of AIDS on their lives.  Whilst I think it had some flaws in the story, that perhaps could benefit from looking at afresh, it was an overwhelmingly powerful and moving theatrical experience that once I started crying there was little to stop me until we reached the end.  As a gay man it resonated.

The Encounter – Complicité – Probably the most inventive storytelling seen so far.  This one man show (Simon McBurney) using sound / foley tricks to recreate a fascinating true story of a encounter of a remote Amazonian tribe by National Geographic photographer Loren McIntyre in 1969

My Name is Lucy Barton – Laura Linney gave an outstanding performance in the play of Pulitzer Prize winner Elizabeth Strout’s best-selling short novel. The design team – including lighting and sound, should also win praise, in this minimalist staging. Perfection.

The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie – Coming out of this production at the Donmar I was just bouncing up and down by how great I thought it was, from the adaptation to the performances to the staging. Sublime!

A 24-Decade History of Pop 1776-1806 – This wonderfully outrageous show by Taylor Mac defies categorisation with its use of a 22-piece orchestra, drag, audience participation (at the Barbican no less), historical storytelling and musical history and deconstruction.  I have never seen anything quite like it and cannot wait for the next instalment (1806-1836)!

XENOS – I’m sneaking in this dance piece by Akram Khan at Sadlers Wells (out of order of my timeline) because I do think this man is a choreographic genius, but also as it was also a tour de force of storytelling and staging, shining a light on Indian soldiers fighting for the British during WW1.  His last solo show will not be forgotten (and I cannot wait to see what his company does next).

So there we have it 10 of my 20/20 productions taking us up to 6 months into 2018.  I am genuinely excited and intrigued to see whether the remainder of the year can reach such zeniths of perfection.

 

* Photo credits: Matthew Murphy (Hamilton); Jan Versweyveld (Network); Tristram Kenton (Brothers Size); Marc Brenner (Summer and Smoke); Simon Annand (The Inheritance); Jenny Anderson/Getty Images (The Encounter); Manuel Harlan (Lucy Barton & Miss Jean Brodie); Sarah Walker (Taylor Mac)

Mr Rowlinson – A Beginning

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You need a hook, a backstory.  That’s the idea. Mine is a former English teacher called Mr Rowlinson.  Back then (in the 1980s) he taught the first two years at secondary school.  It was not a traditional classroom, but one set up with benches, four rows, divided in the middle, facing towards a raised platform that was to act as our stage.  The division down the middle of the seats split the class into two, and each half of the class for the rest of that year then formed a theatrical team, which was given the name of a guild – ours was the Haberdashers Guild.  A play for the term was selected by Mr Rowlinson (or possibly as part of a unseen curriculum), usually Shakespeare, and each guild then alternated each scene within the play.  For those within each guild we had to select the actors, others to do the lighting design, or select and queue music (from a selection of old classical 78s), those to arrange the set (we had limited blocks to move about and no chance of painting scenery) and even someone to write up and design a poster for the production.

This then was really my first introduction to both Shakespeare and the complete workings of the theatre (within our limited remit).  I’m discounting the primary school production of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat, or even a pre-prep school foray treading the boards for some production – was it Annie? – where the Headmistress insisted everyone, including the boys, learnt ballet.  Those earlier exposures were nothing like as intensive or broad as those first two years in the upper school.

So I should probably state that at the time this was an all boys school.  As a result, in good Elizabethan theatrical style, the female roles were naturally also played by us boys.  And as luck would have it I managed to get the roles of Calpurnia, Julia Caesar’s wife and Lady Macbeth. I also played Heracles as the deus ex machina finale in Philoctetes by Sophocles as the end of year production in front of parents.  And once I played one of two crows in some random Scottish ballad, the details I now forget, other than my fellow crow and I both studied crows on the school playing fields to check if they walked or hopped about, and any other elements of realism two teenage boys could bring to a crow on stage.

I never though plucked up the courage to audition for any of the main school plays that pulled talent from across the school.  Although as we moved up through the school our English classes always involved some end of term performance in front of parents.  I recall we performed an extract of Henry IV Part 1, although I don’t now remember the part I played.  More fun in those years was that we got to write our own pieces.  Initially we wrote plays about soldiers and officers in the trenches of World War One and then later we got to write and perform comedy sketches.

There was one other English teacher I should probably thank for my love of theatre now, and that was a Mr Porter.  I chose not to take A Level English (for reasons I wont explain here otherwise this is just becoming an autobiography of schoolboy memories), but had I done so, or had I auditioned for the main school play, then Mr Porter would have been a far more prominent figure.  As it was, and I’m not quite sure how, by the time I entered the Sixth Form I was known to enjoy going to the theatre, and when there were spaces on trips to London to see a performance, I would be able to join.  These were often classes for younger years, such as those doing their GCSEs.  I remember getting to see productions at both the National (Daniel Day Lewis in Hamlet) and the Young Vic (Corialanus).  So I owe a debt of gratitude to Mr Porter to allow me to go.

There is one final reason for naming this blog after my first English teacher.  And it is this.  He marked our homework – for we did also have to write stories and poetry – out of 20.  He was a very tough marker.  For the first term I was getting 12 or 13 only.  And gradually when you got back your exercise books and you got your first 14, then 15 and incredibly 16, it was something you really felt you had earned.  I did reach the dizzying heights of a few 17s, and if memory serves me well one 18.  But never more. Never higher.

So when some years ago, prompted by another avid theatregoer I started giving a score for the productions I’d seen.  This was only ever for my own use, or to cross reference with my friend to see what he thought of a play.  Quickly though I found the usual five-star rating wholly inadequate for my needs.  And after a brief period rating out of 10, I recalled Mr Rowlinson’s homework marking out of 20 and decided this would give me sufficient breadth and range to allow me to mark what I have seen.  Then, as I’m often to be found at the theatre, friends would ask for recommendations.  Whilst I’d tweet or mention on Facebook what I’d seen I knew that ideally I would need a bit more space to expand on my thoughts about something I’d seen.  And as a good number of friends asked, I thought perhaps a blog might be the best platform. And so Rowlinson’s Report is now born.

Perhaps one final comment should be given to the fact that I deem the scores to be a little bit fluid.  I tend to come out of a production with an idea, but sometimes a few days later, or longer, I’ll think no this was better or worse than I marked it.  Often there’s a little bit of horse-trading with myself and other productions I’ve seen in the year.  Was it better than X that I scored 16? Perhaps not.  So I’ll adjust accordingly. It’s never a wild variation, and by the end of the year, everything is locked and I don’t go back and change them.

Jesus Hopped The ‘A’ Train

3103a25d-481f-4287-a2c6-3b1f0726a69b-284-000000233939d426Young Vic. On until 30 March

This darkly comic, thought provoking play has a perfect cast of characters: a young man awaiting trial for shooting a cult leader in the arse to try and rescue his buddy, a charismatic serial killer who manipulates all but the most sadistic of guards around him, and a defence lawyer who feels a moral sense of purpose to help those who stand up for themselves.

Set on a traverse stage with perspex walls and doors, we’re reminded of the subway ‘A’ train of the title.  Many scenes become verbal battles pitched back and forth between the characters as they tell their stories, lies or myths.  Angel (played superbly by Ukweli Roach) is the angry young man pitched into the American justice system awaiting trial.  We first meet him in his cell attempting to recite the Lord’s Prayer but stumbling over the word “hallowed” as clearly this is an unfamiliar recitation for him, but one he feels he needs in this moment of crisis.  And when he meets his lawyer (Dervla Kirwan) he rejects her for not looking like the type of lawyer he’s seen on TV, like Columbo, in a suit and with a moustache!

Written by Stephen Adly Guirgis, whose only previous work I’d seen was the National’s staging of The Motherfucker with the Hat (and which I’ll be honest underwhelmed me), here brings vivid stories and characters to life with a sharpness of writing that is beguiling.  The charismatic serial killer Lucius, played superbly by Oberon K. A. Adjepong, had me convinced I too would be smuggling him in special Oreos for him if I were in there with him.  Whilst Valdez (Joplin Sibtain) as the sadist prison guard had quickly turned the whole audience against him, and yet it was only through his cruelty that he protected himself from the charms and wiles of Lucius.

The themes of good and evil, right and wrong, salvation and redemption are not too far from the surface, but not thickly layered on as you’re swept along by Angel’s story and where it will end.  False prophets are here too, both in Lucius and the unnamed cult leader Angel shoots.  Angel can see the latter as one to rescue his friend from, but fails to see the danger of his fellow prisoner. Like the Mary Jane, Angel’s lawyer, who risks her career to save Angel, we as the audience are willing Angel on to do his best on the stand and be freed.  Whether it was the writing, the acting or the perfect alchemy between the two, but I too would have risked it all to save Angel.  And there perhaps is no better praise for the play and this production.

This current season of the Young Vic is certainly proving to be exciting, refreshing and unmissable.

February 15. (Downstairs B53-4)

17/20

9 to 5

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Clockwise Top Left: Natalie McQueen; Bonnie Langford; Amber Davis; Caroline Sheen with co-stars. Photos by Pamela Raith 

Savoy Theatre.  Booking until August.

This is a fun, crowd-pleaser of a musical that will have everyone up and dancing for the encore (of the title song).

If you know the film, then you know the plot and the characters. Although a few shortcuts have been made (we lose the cop scene with the body in the boot, sadly but understandably hard to re-create on stage), we don’t loose any of the comic drama.

We’re still set in the 1980s and a videoed intro by Dolly herself sets the period and introduces us to the characters we know but obviously don’t recognise in the guise of Caroline Sheen (Violet aka Lilly Tomlin in the film), Amber Davis (Judy aka Jane Fonda) and Natalie McQueen (aka Dolly).

The themes of misogyny, workplace harassment and women banding together to fight oppression necessarily has a current resonance. Which in many ways makes this a bit of a depressing watch. The opening scene where Hart (Brian Connolly who manages to land the sleaze / comedy balance well) chases Doralee around the office, frankly made my skin crawl. And I half hoped there would be some updating.

We get a few contemporary nods – jokes about equal pay and women CEOs (tongues firmly in cheeks) – as well as a scene in the office kitchen where the women eye up one of the guys in the office. But otherwise we’re firmly in 1980 – including the fashions, furniture and attitudes.

Songs penned by Dolly give us some further understanding of characters and their emotional state. Stand out for me was ‘Backwards Barbie’, in which the character of Doralee gives a heartfelt plea for society to not judge a book by its cover. ‘Shine Like the Sun’ brings our three protagonists ganging up together and works well giving us the crescendo to take us into the interval.  Violet’s ‘One of the Boys’ and Judy’s ‘Get Out and Stay Out’ are good solid tunes, very much in the traditional musical mould with ‘Change It’ giving us an anthemic tune for Act II.

Bonnie Langford who plays the company spy to Hart, gets a show-stealing scene and song, ‘Heart to Hart’, where her (frankly unfathomable) lust for Hart is given full vent!

Natalie McQueen does a brilliant job as Doralee – both in belting out the songs, the look and the southern drawl.

For me this was a hugely enjoyable night out. It has weaknesses though, one purely in the depressing nature of how far we haven’t come in terms of equality, the other though is in a lack of ambition in terms of staging and songs. Overall I would say it is a safe musical. And whilst I know it will do incredibly well, and deservedly so, those seeking something more challenging surely know there is more on offer.

February 6 (Stalls D2-3)

14/20

February Picks

img_8991So for February I’ve got the following plays booked up:

9 to 5 The Musical @ Savoy Theatre – the classic comedy film from 80s brought to life as a musical with songs by Dolly Parton, this couldn’t get much camper if it tried!

Berberian Sound Studio @ Donmar Warehouse – probably couldn’t get more of a contrast in film adaptations with Peter Strickland’s darkly comic horror coming to the stage.

Jesus Hopped the A Train @ Young Vic – hoping the combination of the dark comedy set on murderers’ row, written by Stephen Adly Guirgis, will maintain the Young Vic’s impressive new season.

Shipwreck @ Almeida – new play by the tremendous Anne Washburn (Mr Burns will never ever leave me!) and directed by Artistic Director Rupert Goold.

When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other @ National Theatre – the ballot-only production with Cate Blanchett that had sold out is now garnering some terrible reviews! Oh well only one way to find out if this is a turkey is to see it myself.

Gently Down the Stream @ Park Theatre is a new play by Martin Sherman who wrote the award-winning play Bent.

And I’m still yet to get around to book the following:

Nine Night @ Trafalgar Studios – having failed to squeeze this in at the end of last year I’ve got to get to see it before it ends its run on 23 February.

The Son @ Kiln – the UK premiere of the latest play from the prolific and intriguing playwright Florian Zeller (The Mother, The Father, The Truth, The Height of the Storm) – I’ve seen every one produced in London over the last few years.

Pinter 7 @ Harold Pinter Theatre – having seen all but Pinter 4 so far, it would be quite nice to add this one with Martin Freeman and Danny Dyer, but we’ll see.

 

Plugging the Park

The Park Theatre Jan - Jun 2019
A selection of images of shows in the Park Theatre 2019 season

A few friends have recently asked what I’m booking up ahead of time, rather than finding out after the event what they should have seen.  Which is a fair ask, given that I’m sometimes catching the last night of a run and / or not getting to blog about it in a timely manner.

So the Park Theatre 2019 Jan – Jun Season has been available to book for a little while, but I’ve just got around to booking a clutch of plays coming up.

Now whilst I have no direct affiliation to the Park Theatre (a stone’s throw from Finsbury Park Station) I can proudly claim it as one of my local theatre’s and hence I’m more than happy to bumble along and see what’s on.  That and the fact it has consistently been putting on some interesting and challenging plays.

The Park Theatre has two stages, the smaller Park 90 and the larger Park 200.  In the smaller you tend to get more intimate productions, often more experimental, whilst on the larger stage you may find more popular plays or higher profile actors who will possibly ensure a packed production (such as David Haig in Pressure recently). Yet the theatre manages to keep a local and friendly feel, which makes it feel like a place you want to spend time in.  And because of this local feel you often find yourself meeting and chatting with the actors and directors after a show.  This gives it a reality and a personal feel that lies at the heart of its charm.

So you’ll find me propping up the bar (before, during and after) the following shows:

The Dame – story of a northern pantomime Dame, staring Peter Duncan, written by his daughter and having had previous outings up in Edinburgh the last two years. 2 -26 Jan.

My Dad’s Gap Year – Dave and his gay son on holiday in Thailand and directed by Rikki Beadle-Blair (who recently directed Alexis Gregory in The Riot Act). 30 Jan – 23 Feb.

Gently Down The Stream – A UK debut of this play written by Martin Sherman who wrote Bent, which charts a gay history leading to marriage equality. 13 Feb- 16 Mar.

The Life I Lead – Based on the true life story behind the actor David Tomlinson, best know for playing the uptight father in Mary Poppins, and played by Miles Jupp (and my favourite current host of The News Quiz). 18 – 30 Mar.

The Last Temptation of Boris Johnson – A comedy drama written by Jonathan Maitland who wrote An Audience with Jimmy Saville. Given this will be playing post Brexit, it will either be painfully funny or hilariously painful! 9 May – 8 Jun

There is much more on in the new season and more that I’m still highly likely to go see, but these are my first picks.  For more details check out their website.

November Picks

So a number of friends have asked me to share what I’m booking and what tickets I’m looking to get my hands on.

So in November and December I don’t plan too far ahead to allow for work / client Christmas parties but here is what I’m going to:

The Greater Game @ Waterloo Theatre – this I’m going to with my theatre wife (I’ll explain later) as her plus one. This is my First World War One themed play for November, based around the true story of the Clapton Orient football team who all joined up together to fight in the war. On until 25 November.

Hadestown @ National Theatre – this musical which mixes modern American folk music and New Orleans jazz to become an off-Broadway smash. Musical + classical myth of Orpheus’ decent to the underworld = my sweet spot. On until 26 January

Company @ Gielgud Theatre – this has been a hot ticket for a while, and I do love Sondheim! Booking until 30 March 2019

Forgotten @ Arcola – I was fascinated by this lost story about how 140,00 Chinese came to support Britain and the Allies behind the front lines during World War One. In the run up to the 100 years since Armistice Day, it felt important to keep learning about the history of this time. On until 17 November

I’m also looking at booking :

Honour @ Park Theatre – this was recommended to me and looks to be a gripping play about marriage that is compared to Pinter’s Betrayal and Hare’s Skylight – and that’s sold me. On until 24 November.

King Lear @ Duke of York – yes I know, it’s been on my list for ages to see Sir Ian McKellen in this lauded production and I’m hoping to grab a single ticket for myself before it ends this Saturday 3 November.

OthelloMacbeth @ Lyric Hammersmith – I like the audacity of bringing both plays together, described as “two iconic plays, seven deaths, fourteen characters, one unique evening”. I’ve got to move fast as it also finishes this Saturday 3 November, so this maybe one I miss.